Hexagrams Base-4 Underlying the Yi Jing System

The approach I have been presenting also shows the exact correspondence of a base-four line system and the Yi Jing series.

The key to see this is to assume an appropriate translation of the “strong yin” and the “weak yang” lines, into the corresponding base four system. The two hexagrams depicted below are: on the left, the expanded version (showing the weak and strong lines combined with the “unchanging” yin and yang lines; and on the right, the basic Yi Jing without marking the changing lines).

▄▄▄ ▄▄▄ ▄▄▄ ▄▄▄  ▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄
▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄  ▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄
▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄  ▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄
▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄  ▄▄▄▄▄     ▄▄▄▄▄
▄▄▄   ▄▄▄   ▄▄▄  ▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄
▄▄▄   ▄▄▄   ▄▄▄  ▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄
Hexagram (*) # 19 - Lin / APPROACHING - 311122 - 000011

(*) Simultaneous generation of two Hexagrams

In this way, we can clearly see that the Yi Jing sequence is much longer than the well-known 64 hexagrams, actually comprising a total of  4096 combinations.

Here we can see the intrinsic complexity of the Yi Jing, despite the superficial “limitation” of the 64 figures. Hence the importance of reading and  — if so desired– interpreting the changing lines and the derived hexagrams.

In contrast, the Tai Xuan Jing –without changing lines– introduces variations in the readings by modifying the relevance of the “appraisals” or commentaries associated with each one of the 81 figures. These changes are driven by the time of the day, the period of the year and other criteria.

I am now considering if the hexagram, with its neat composition by pairs of essential images (e.g. “fire over water”) could still be the representation of the base-four system; or if it is more appropriate to employ an “octogram” or other patterns to reveal the full expansion of these systems.